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Terry Flew http://terryflew.com Thu, 11 Feb 2016 22:33:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.1 Terry Flew Terry Flew http://terryflew.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://terryflew.com Crisis Communication in the news http://terryflew.com/2016/02/crisis-communication-in-the-news.html Thu, 11 Feb 2016 22:33:23 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1809 Here is the story that appeared on ABC News to coincide with the launch of our report:

Flew, T., Bruns, A., Burgess, J., Ben-Harush, O., Potter, E. & Newton, J., 2015, Support Frameworks for the Use of Social Media by Emergency Management Organisations – Policy Report, QUT Digital Media Research Centre/Centre for Emergency and Disaster Management.

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Here is the story that appeared on ABC News to coincide with the launch of our report:

Flew, T., Bruns, A., Burgess, J., Ben-Harush, O., Potter, E. & Newton, J., 2015, Support Frameworks for the Use of Social Media by Emergency Management Organisations – Policy Report, QUT Digital Media Research Centre/Centre for Emergency and Disaster Management.

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Co-productions, entertainment media, and Chinese cultural soft power http://terryflew.com/2016/01/co-productions-entertainment-media-and-chinese-cultural-soft-power.html Wed, 20 Jan 2016 19:12:39 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1802 This is my presentation given to the U.S.-China Institute at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, on 19 January 2016. Thanks to Professor Clayton Dube, US-China Institute Director, for hosting the talk. Thanks also to Professor Ernest Wilson II, Dean of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism for making time available, and to Dr. David Craig for brokering the visit.

A video of the presentation will be available on YouTube shortly. I will link it to this

Continue Reading]]> This is my presentation given to the U.S.-China Institute at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, on 19 January 2016. Thanks to Professor Clayton Dube, US-China Institute Director, for hosting the talk. Thanks also to Professor Ernest Wilson II, Dean of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism for making time available, and to Dr. David Craig for brokering the visit.

A video of the presentation will be available on YouTube shortly. I will link it to this site.

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The last David Bowie blog post http://terryflew.com/2016/01/the-last-david-bowie-blog-post.html Sun, 17 Jan 2016 11:42:00 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1789

Like many around the world, David Bowie’s death on 10 January left me feeling a sense of overwhelming grief and loss. There are a lot of things that could be said about the reaction to Bowie’s death, at age 69, and Jean Burgess’s piece in Medium captures nicely the way in which news of Bowie’s death triggered a huge collective response through social media, that was matched by collective gatherings around the world, at streets in Brixton, bars and clubs

Continue Reading]]> David Bowie

Like many around the world, David Bowie’s death on 10 January left me feeling a sense of overwhelming grief and loss. There are a lot of things that could be said about the reaction to Bowie’s death, at age 69, and Jean Burgess’s piece in Medium captures nicely the way in which news of Bowie’s death triggered a huge collective response through social media, that was matched by collective gatherings around the world, at streets in Brixton, bars and clubs that decided to stay oepn all night and play Bowie, and flash mob programming at events such as the Sydney Festival .

The genre of discussing how David Bowie changed your life has now been well and truly played out, inviting parody when it becomes and occasion for journalists and others to essentially talk about themselves via the muse that is David Bowie. Will Self’s obituary in the New Statesman is a good example of the genre, where the expectation of writing 1000 words about Bowie becomes a call to write 1000 words about himself (NB: this now appears to be behind a paywall).

So rather than do that, I will list a Bowie top ten songs. All but two accompanied by fantastic music videos – Bowie got the significance of the music video as part of the whole package of being a musician, artist and entertainer well in advance of almost all of his peers:

1. Heroes
2. Life on Mars
3. Wild is the Wind
4. Sound and Vision
5. Fashion
6. John I’m Only Dancing
7. DJ
8. Fame
9. Ashes to Ashes
10. Space Oddity

In doing a list like this, you are always struck by what you have missed. The list could include all of the songs that basically made Bowie rich and famous: Space Oddity, Ziggy Stardust, Starman, The Jean Genie, Rebel Bebel, Golden Years and, later, Let’s Dance (nearly put that one in), Modern Love and Under Pressure. There are also the less well know gems like The Man Who Sold the World, Be My Wife and Look Back in Anger, and those songs that are completely kick-arse live, like the epic version of Station to Station on the 1978 tour. The latter is a good example of what Bowie did so well. The song is inspired by Kraftwerk, just as the Young Americans album adopted back American Philly soul, but rather that simply being copying, it becomes something else, something that has Bowie’s unique musical signature.

There has been much uncovering of David Bowie material from the online cultural vaults over the last week. These range from his Japanese sake commercial from 1980 to TV appearances on everything from The Dinah Shore Show to the Kenny Everett Video Show (KE line: “I fought for men like you … I didn’t get one”!).

This one from the Australian TV program Countdown from 1978 is one to note, featuring the inimitable interviewing style of Ian “Molly” Meldrum, some great lines (“Fame is about management”), and something we do not see enough of in TV interviews – men sitting around on a tennis court smoking and chatting!

There are various pieces around on Bowie as stylistic innovator. This includes his recognition o how the Internet would change music, and indeed all entertainment, by making content ubiquitous – and hence hard to make money from – and making live performance more important. Bowie was thus an innovator in media economics long before most of his peers, just as he recognised the centrality of video to music in the 1970s. He also had very interesting observations on art and artists, considering himself to be very much an artist, but also being very much aware of how the art world differed form that of rock music:

D.B. … the art world always widens its parameters to elevate something from low art to high art.
M.K. That’s an obvious difference between the art world and the rock-music world.
D.B. The difference is that one has a brain [laughs].

“Spinal Tap” really wasn’t off the mark. There’s a high degree of fame-seeking in rock, and I think that gets in the way of some great potential.

M.K. Art’s not altogether different in that sense, is it?
D.B. Yeah, it’s true. I guess the same can also be said about some visual artists. But success in art seems to be a lot more about knowing and buttering up a few people. If a visual artist is articulate about his work, he can tell collectors what to think about what they’re buying. People won’t sit still to hear a rock musician say why someone should spend 15 bucks on his album. You can’t get away with much in rock without somebody saying “You got to be kidding me.” You’re not talking about 20 people; you are talking in hundreds of thousands, if you’re lucky, and so a consensus forms about the music. As a rock musician you can live with your audience, no matter what the critics say. Let me tell you, many times I’ve had to. The ups and downs can be pretty terrifying [laughs].

The final words on David Bowie can be left to Bret MacKenzie and Jermaine Clement AKA the New Zealand based comedy band Flight of the Conchords. Recounting just what Bowie nerds the two of them were, he talks about their plans to record a Bowie song:

In 1999 Bret McKenzie and I were sitting with our guitars in our dingy flat in Wellington trying to learn David Bowie songs. They were catchy, which usually translates to being easy to play. Not David Bowie. He’d taken Paul McCartney’s style of making an epic medley song and made it more subtle, parts seamlessly changing without you even realising it. You’d just feel the change like a change in your own mood.

He’d taken rock’n’roll and added parts of black soul music which somehow he’d made white without making it uncool. We couldn’t play these songs. They were too tricky to learn, too many parts – all those tricky chords, all those tempo changes, the changes in vocal range, sometimes a deep masculine growl, sometimes a high falsetto of some third alien gender.

We sat around defeated by our hero’s chord book but admiring him more. He’d made pop songs into mini operas but without showing off about it.

The result was the fabulous Bowie’s in Space.

In the same episode, Bret is visited by three ghosts of Bowie: the Alladin Sane Bowie, the Ashes to Ashes Bowie, and the Labyrinth Bowie. In a great mix of parody and homage, Clement explains how “Bret, a slim man, would be visited by Bowie, a hero to slim men everywhere”, dispensing invaluable career advice to “wear an eye patch” and “be outrageous”.

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Digital Futures for Australian Culture: Obituary for Brian Johns AO (1936-2016) http://terryflew.com/2016/01/digital-futures-for-australian-culture-obituary-for-brian-johns-ao-1936-2016.html Fri, 01 Jan 2016 07:02:38 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1784 The passing of Brian Johns on January 1, 2015, at the age of 79, has seen much public acknowledgement of his unique contributions to Australian media, culture and public life. Starting his career as a journalist, and becoming the Canberra chief political correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald, he worked in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet under both the Whitlam and Fraser governments. He went to be publishing director at Penguin Books in 1979, before being appointed Managing

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The passing of Brian Johns on January 1, 2015, at the age of 79, has seen much public acknowledgement of his unique contributions to Australian media, culture and public life. Starting his career as a journalist, and becoming the Canberra chief political correspondent for The Sydney Morning Herald, he worked in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet under both the Whitlam and Fraser governments. He went to be publishing director at Penguin Books in 1979, before being appointed Managing Director of the Special Broadcasting Service from 1987 to 1992, and the first Chair of the newly established Australian Broadcasting Authority.

In the role that he is best known for, Johns was Managing Director of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation from 1995 to 2000. After that often-stormy time, he became an Adjunct Professor in the Creative Industries Faculty at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and Chair of University’s cultural precinct. He also served as a director on the board of the Copyright Agency Limited, and was chairman from 2004 to 2009, and was a director of the Board of Melbourne University Publishing.

It was during his time at QUT, in the aftermath of his time as Managing Director of the ABC, that I got to know Brian Johns. Working with Professors Stuart Cunningham and John Hartley, and with staff in the newly created Creative Industries Faculty, Brian took a very active role in advising on how to structure the ambitious new Faculty to best take advantage of the opportunities presented by digital technologies to revitalise arts and culture, as well as professional fields such as Journalism, which he took a particularly active interest in.

Being in the office next to Brian, I got to talk with him about a wide range of issues. Interesting, given the controversies at the time around his replacement at the ABC – the short-lived and ill-fated reign of Jonathon Shier – he was reluctant to provide a running commentary on changes at the ABC. Even though he was often contacted by the media about the ABC, he did not want to comment on his successor’s performance, taking the view that at the time he became the ABC’s Managing Director, the last thing he would have wanted was David Hill, as his predecessor, commenting on his won performance.

What he was particularly keen to talk about was the opportunities presented by digital technologies for Australian arts, media and culture, as well as the potential dangers. For Brian, the biggest risk was not presented by new technologies themselves, but by failing to respond to their radical changes they were bringing to these industries and professions. He brought such a pro-active approach to his time at both the SBS and the ABC. Mark Scott has paid tribute to Brian as the person who clearly grasped the need for the ABC to be at the forefront of adopting the new digital technologies if it was going to remain relevant to Australians, and hence maintain the levels of public support that were the best guarantor of ongoing funding in times of great political turbulence for the national broadcaster.

There were two particularly important lessons that could be taken from time spent with Brian Johns. One was that he retained a strong egalitarian spirit whatever the public standing that his position held. He was genuinely committed to talking to as many people as possible to get ideas about how best to manage change in an organisation. He was intellectually curious and a very good listener. Perhaps a legacy of his time spent in the Catholic Seminary, or his modest upbringing in tropical North Queensland.

Another was Brian’s commitment to a public service ethos. Not providing a running commentary on his successors in leadership roles at the ABC was an element of this. Another was the way in which he could work with both Labor and Liberal governments. While he certainly had strong and clear political views, and they tended broadly to the left, he was of the view that advancing the public good in any role required a capacity to “work across the aisle” and be open to ideas from across the political spectrum. He did enable advertising to commence on SBS under his tenure as Managing Director (then euphemistically termed “sponsorship”), and he was able to work with new ventures in the private sector, such as On Line Opinion, as well as with public sector media and cultural organisations. He also had a good eye for what sorts of content would provide popular with Australian readers and viewers.

His clearest commitments were to the advancement of Australian culture. A recurring theme of his work in broadcasting and publishing was his commitment to promoting new Australian cultural voices, and he was in that sense a cultural nationalist of the sort who came through Australian public life in the 1960s and 1970s.

In his role as Chair of the Copyright Agency Ltd., he initiated the establishment of a Cultural Fund whereby a percentage of CAL’s funds would be committed to grants and fellowships to support Australian authors, artists and cultural creators. The statement on the CAL Cultural Fund web site that “the cultural heritage of any society begins with a spark of imagination and the nurturing of talent” is one that is very much in keeping with the commitment and focus of Brian Johns.

In passing on condolences to his wife Sarah, and to his children, it can be noted that Brian Johns was a very generous and visionary individual. Interested in engaging with people and gauging as many opinions as possible, he combined a strong commitment to national culture and public service with an eye to the opportunities presented by new technologies, and the need to actively embrace the possibilities of the digital future. He saw innovation and creativity as linked, and he saw cultural development and engagement with ordinary Australians in their everyday lives as being integrally linked. It was a pleasure to be able to talk with Brian about issues, and to get his insights. He will be missed.

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Two papers on censorship http://terryflew.com/2015/12/two-papers-on-censorship.html Sun, 27 Dec 2015 22:45:11 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1781 I presented two papers at the ACADEMIC RESEARCH, NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES AND THE CULTURE OF CONTROL interdisciplinary workshop, at the University of Wollongong from 2-3 October, 2015. The event was hosted by the School of Humanities and Social Inquiry in the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts, and organised by Mark McLelland and Andrew Whelan.

My public lecture for the Faculty, titled Porn, Censorship, Classification and Free Speech: Global Paradoxes in the Governance of Media Content, can now be downloaded

Continue Reading]]> I presented two papers at the ACADEMIC RESEARCH, NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES AND THE CULTURE OF CONTROL interdisciplinary workshop, at the University of Wollongong from 2-3 October, 2015. The event was hosted by the School of Humanities and Social Inquiry in the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts, and organised by Mark McLelland and Andrew Whelan.

My public lecture for the Faculty, titled Porn, Censorship, Classification and Free Speech: Global Paradoxes in the Governance of Media Content, can now be downloaded here. The workshop presentation, Regulation Beyond Government: Weber, Foucault and the Liberal Governance of Media Content, can be downloaded here. The latter is likely to be a chapter in a forthcoming book on Youth and Technology: Pleasure and Governance, to be edited by Catherine Driscoll and Liam Grealy.

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Cash for papers? http://terryflew.com/2015/12/cash-for-papers.html Sun, 13 Dec 2015 02:14:53 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1775 While people in the arts, humanities and social sciences have valid concerns about an overly narrow “innovation agenda“, I would be wary of a knee-jerk defence of the “cash for papers” framework of current Research Block Funding models as inherently good for the HASS disciplines. The question of whether institutions should automatically receive about $3,000 for short papers in conference proceedings that are not of the highest international standard is surely a valid one.

Also, if the ERA has seen

Continue Reading]]> While people in the arts, humanities and social sciences have valid concerns about an overly narrow “innovation agenda“, I would be wary of a knee-jerk defence of the “cash for papers” framework of current Research Block Funding models as inherently good for the HASS disciplines. The question of whether institutions should automatically receive about $3,000 for short papers in conference proceedings that are not of the highest international standard is surely a valid one.

Also, if the ERA has seen the number of scholarly journal articles increase from 200,000 in 2010 to 300,000 in 2015, it would be timely to think about whether the biggest priority for the sector is to get the number of journal articles to 400,000 by 2020. Labor has flagged its concerns about better university-industry links and incentives to do something other than “publish or perish”, so it is not a politically partisan issue.

Finally, the HERDC system has never overcome its inherent bias against the creative and performing arts. Performances, exhibitions, novels, short stories, poems, journalistic work, designs and research reports all count in the ERA but not in HERDC, which has long been criticised in the sector. There has long been an issue, for instance, as to why one’s film script cannot be credited in HERDC, but writing about someone else’s scripts and having that published in a journal article or conference paper can.

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ICA 2016 Pre-conference – Willing Collaborators: The Rise of China, and Changing Networks of Asian Media Production. http://terryflew.com/2015/10/ica-2016-pre-conference-willing-collaborators-the-rise-of-china-and-changing-networks-of-asian-media-production.html Wed, 21 Oct 2015 20:27:47 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1765 International Communication Association 2016 Pre-conference: Willing Collaborators: The Rise of China, and Changing Networks of Asian Media Production.

Date & Time: Wednesday, June 8, 2016; 8.30 am to 5.30 pm (day before the ICA Conference begins at 5pm on June 9 in Fukuoka, Japan)

Location/Venue: Tokyo University of the Arts, Kitasenju Campus. Senju, Adachi-ku, Tokyo.

Division Affiliation: Global Communication and Social Change

Organizers: Terry Flew, Queensland University of Technology, Australia Anthony Fung, Chinese University of Hong Kong Mouri Yoshitaka, Tokyo University of the Arts Michael Keane, Curtin University, Australia Brian Yecies,

Continue Reading]]> International Communication Association 2016 Pre-conference:
Willing Collaborators: The Rise of China, and Changing Networks of Asian Media Production.

Date & Time:
Wednesday, June 8, 2016; 8.30 am to 5.30 pm (day before the ICA Conference begins at 5pm on June 9 in Fukuoka, Japan)

Location/Venue:
Tokyo University of the Arts, Kitasenju Campus. Senju, Adachi-ku, Tokyo.

Division Affiliation:
Global Communication and Social Change

Organizers:
Terry Flew, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Anthony Fung, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Mouri Yoshitaka, Tokyo University of the Arts
Michael Keane, Curtin University, Australia
Brian Yecies, University of Wollongong, Australia

Description and Objectives:
This pre-conference is focused on the transformations of East Asian media production associated with the rise of China as a production centre, a large cultural market, and the centre of a growing number of strategic alliances ad co-production arrangements in the region. The current period is one of rapid change in the status of China in global media production that is not well understood in much of the scholarly literature on global communication. The pre-conference provides a platform for conversations about how this is having impacts in the region, and for film, TV, games and other digital content industries in Japan, Korea and other countries in the East Asian region.

Historically, the Chinese Mainland was, and still is, a low-cost location for film, TV and related creative industries sectors, tied into what has been referred to as the “New International Division of Cultural Labor” (NICL) as a site of low cost media production. For instance, the Hengdian World Studios in Zhejiang province (“Chinawood”) was established to compete on price, and has successfully monopolised the bulk of historical dramas and films made in China. But China now has ‘nationally accredited’ production bases in almost every province, and in the online and mobile media world, it is host to some of the world’s most advanced new platforms and technologies, driven by the ever expanding coffers of media giants such as Sohu, Youku, Sina Video, LeTV and Tencent Video and their evolving ecosystems – companies which have successfully captured the world’s largest media audience.

It also considers rethinking in the upper echelons of the Chinese state about how to revitalise media production sector, and content aimed at domestic markets in particular, to reverse China’s ‘cultural trade deficit’, and generate new forms of ‘cultural soft power’. For example, despite their long-standing reputation for censorship, state policymakers are now encouraging Chinese media entrepreneurs to generate fresh ideas and come up with solutions to revitalise the stagnant domestic production sector. We propose that for scholars seeking to open up conversations in this area, these developments offer a timely opportunity for gaining deeper insights into the world’s largest media playground as the world moves into the ‘Asian Century’, and the ICA pre-conference format provides an ideal platform for such discussions.

Topics of interest for this pre-conference include:

• Film and TV co-productions involving Chinese and international partners;
• The influence of Korean and Japanese cultural product among Chinese audiences/consumers;
• Theories of cultural soft power and cultural trade;
• Chinese media laws and content regulations, and their impact on competition in Chinese media markets;
• Strategic alliances in games and digital content industries;
• Chinese media companies and their global aspirations;
• Chinese media and digital content and its significance among the Chinese diaspora.

How to participate:
If you wish to present a paper at this event, please post an abstract of 200-300 words to https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=ica16willing. This must be submitted no later than Friday 4 December, 21:00 (AEST). The organisers will consider these submissions and advise on acceptance on or shortly after ICA general acceptances are announced in mid-January.

Note: it is assumed that presenters will be available to attend the event for the full day. If you are coming from overseas, we recommend that you arrive in Tokyo by June 7, and make appropriate accommodation arrangements for that night. We will look to have a dinner on 8 June, and attendees may wish to take the Shinkansen to Fukuoka on June 9 to arrive in time for the opening conference plenary at 5pm.

Cost for registration and attendance:
$US80/$US40 concession (for graduate students and employment exception ICA members).

Transportation:
The campus is located near JR Kita-Senju station. Going to/from Narita airport is very convenient: the Narita Express to Nishi-Nippori takes about 40 mins, and it then takes about 6 mins from Nishi-Nippori to Kita-Senju. It is only 3-4 mins from Kita-Senju station to the campus on foot. The location is also convenient for the Shinkansen train to Fukuoka.

Accommodation:
There are a range of accommodation options in the vicinity of the Senju campus. The Hotel Coco Grand, near Senju station, has rooms at about $US100 per night. http://www.cocogrand.co.jp/kitasenju/

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Use of the term ‘soft power’ http://terryflew.com/2015/09/use-of-the-term-soft-power.html Sat, 26 Sep 2015 05:02:19 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1760 The graph below shows the acceleration of the use of the term ‘soft power’ from 1990 to the present, using Google nGram. Rarely used prior to the 1990s, its usage took off after the publication of Harvard international relations theorist Jospeh Nye’s 1990 book Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. The term experiences a second take off after 2000, with the work of Nye again being influential, including his 2004 book Soft Power: The Means to Success

Continue Reading]]>
The graph below shows the acceleration of the use of the term ‘soft power’ from 1990 to the present, using Google nGram. Rarely used prior to the 1990s, its usage took off after the publication of Harvard international relations theorist Jospeh Nye’s 1990 book Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power. The term experiences a second take off after 2000, with the work of Nye again being influential, including his 2004 book Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics.

Importantly, as the 2000s have progressed, its influence has extended well beyond the United States. In particular, the term has proven to be very influential in China. The dynamics of this development are captured by Falk Hartig, of Frankfurt University, in his PhD thesis on Confucius Institutes, undertaken at the Queensland University of Technology in Australia and other related work, including this paper I co-authored with Falk in the IAFOR Journal of Asian Studies.

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The nice side of Twitter http://terryflew.com/2015/09/the-nice-side-of-twitter.html Wed, 09 Sep 2015 22:18:44 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1750 I must say I am often someone who wonders about Twitter. While I work with some of the world’s leading researchers into Twitter, such as Axel Bruns and Jean Burgess, I am also sympathetic to the view that it can be a platform for planetary level public shaming and virtue signalling.

We should not necessarily criticise people for engaging in low-cost forms of public participation. As Barbie Zelizer has recently noted, responses to images such as that of the body

Continue Reading]]> I must say I am often someone who wonders about Twitter. While I work with some of the world’s leading researchers into Twitter, such as Axel Bruns and Jean Burgess, I am also sympathetic to the view that it can be a platform for planetary level public shaming and virtue signalling.

We should not necessarily criticise people for engaging in low-cost forms of public participation. As Barbie Zelizer has recently noted, responses to images such as that of the body of Aylan Kurdi, the Kurdish boy who drowned trying to take a boat into Europe, have had a significant impact in reframing the often toxic conversation about access to countires such as those of Europe – as well as Australia – from conflict zones such as Syria.

But there is also a point to Helen Lewis’s observation that a social media hivemind can generate a political echo chamber, when one takes it to be a proxy for broader public opinion. Just as the US Republican Party succumbed to such hivemind thinking in the assumption that Mitt Romney was going to win the 2012 Presidential election despite opinion polls largely indicating the return of Barack Obama, so too did the UK left overestimate the electoral support for Ed Miliband’s labour party in the May 2015 General Election, only to be surprised by the actual votes of the real electorate. Or as Suzanne Moore subsequently observed in the Guardian:

Socialist Paradise

In that respect, it was nice to find an endorsement of the argumetns I made in Global Creative industries on Twitter by Gian Paolo Manzella. Manzella is a regional Councillor for Lazio in the Italian Democratic Party, a centre-left party that is the successor to the famous Italian Communist Party. Manzella’s endorsement of the book from a policy perspective can be found here (English translation here).

The subsequent online exchange confirmed what can be described as the nice side of Twitter: the opportunities it presents for instantaneous collaboration among strangers across distances, when required.

Gian Paolo Manzella

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Markets, Values and Governance: Economic Aspects of Public Service Media in Transition http://terryflew.com/2015/09/markets-values-and-governance-economic-aspects-of-public-service-media-in-transition.html Wed, 09 Sep 2015 20:22:11 +0000 http://terryflew.com/?p=1747 I am delighted to be back in Moscow for the International Media Management Academic Association (IMMAA) annual conference, held at the Faculty of Journalism, Lomonosov Moscow State University, from 17-18 September.

The full program is here, and i will be part of a panel on “Markets, Values and Governance: Economic Aspects of Public Service Media in Transition”, with key figures in the field such as the legendary media economist Eli Noam, John Lavine, Elena Vartanova from MSU, and Patrick-Yves Badillo.

Continue Reading]]> I am delighted to be back in Moscow for the International Media Management Academic Association (IMMAA) annual conference, held at the Faculty of Journalism, Lomonosov Moscow State University, from 17-18 September.

The full program is here, and i will be part of a panel on “Markets, Values and Governance: Economic Aspects of Public Service Media in Transition”, with key figures in the field such as the legendary media economist Eli Noam, John Lavine, Elena Vartanova from MSU, and Patrick-Yves Badillo.

The full talk is below – I may reduce it for reasons of time given translation issues. It can also be accessed here. It is based on Chapter Five of Media Economics, co-authored with Stuart Cunningham and Adam Swift.

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