Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics – Chapter Eleven

Written by Terry Flew on October 23, 2009

• The problem of homo economicus and its applicability to domains that are not immediately and directly economic (crime, marriage, child rearing etc.) is interesting as it posits a notion of the “rational subject” that bears no relationship to the work done in the social sciences on how individuals respond to behavioural stimuli, but it also presents homo economicus not as someone who should be left alone (as in the theory of laissez faire), but rather as

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Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics – Chapter Ten

Written by Terry Flew on October 22, 2009

• Paradoxes of German neoliberalism (Ordoliberalism):o How to maintain “light” regulation that dies not act directly upon the market but only in favour of promoting the economic process?o How to address the tension inherent in generalizing the enterprise form to balance the promotion of “warm” moral and cultural values with the “cold” mechanisms of competition?

• ‘The return to the enterprise

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Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics – Chapter Nine

Written by Terry Flew on October 8, 2009

• American neo-liberalism had become a hot topic in France by the late 1970s. Foucault sees key contextual differences between The United States and Germany (and France) as being:1. It emerges as a reaction to the Keynesian policies of Roosevelt and the New Deal, from about 1934;2. The policies of economic and social intervention are motivated in the U.S., as in Britain, not just by Keynesian economics, but by the need

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